Krill Oil Supplementation May Lower Triglycerides


The majority of people who live mainstream western lifestyles and consume typical western-style diets are deficient in all sorts of goodness. Americans in particular fall well short on animal-based omega-3 fatty acids. If you can relate, now is the time to do something about it. Omega-3s should be an essential part of an ongoing diet. The research into this looks particularly promising for krill oil (KO) supplementation as a preferable source.

Krill Oil for Heart Health

We know that poor diet contributes to all kinds of chronic and terminal illnesses. Heart disease is one condition that worries a lot of people and for good reason too. This brings us on to triglycerides. These are a kind of fat found in your blood. All you really need to know about triglycerides is that you don't want too many of them. There are definite links between elevated levels of triglycerides and an increased probability of heart disease, but that's not all. High levels are one of the markers for metabolic syndrome too.

It might sound like a broken record, but the best way to keep triglycerides within the “optimal” range really is to eat a healthy, well-balanced diet as standard, not a one-off. The same goes for omega-3s. Sadly, eating this way is something that most of us cannot, or will not adhere to. This is when a little supplementation comes to your rescue. Research has shown us that krill oil supplements can lower triglyceride levels in people with high triglycerides, or borderline high, by more than ten percent.  According to the research, it does a better job at this than fish oil (FO).

Preventative Measures

If you're in the high risk group you will certainly want to look into KO supplementation. Even if you're not high risk now, you probably will be later on if your diet lacks in goodness. Prevention has to always be preferable to cure when it comes to one's own personal health.

Further Reading of Interest

Krill oil supplementation lowers serum triglycerides without increasing low-density lipoprotein cholesterol in adults with borderline high or high triglyceride levels.

Berge K, Musa-Veloso K, Harwood M, Hoem N, Burri L.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24461313

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